Photographing People

Tony in Rembrandt Lighting

© Arvin Coloma

On Tuesday night we had a great of lighting and laughter. Thanks to all the members who came along. And big thanks to the members who shared their knowledge and their gear to show us all how to do what we do.

I look forward to seeing some great portraits in the future from our members.

Sourcing Subjects

  • Friends, Family, Familiars
    Rope in anyone you can get in front of your lens
    Pay with love and kindness and the occasional print or book
  • Hang your shingle
    Get ads in local newspapers, on community boards, etc
    They may well pay you, or you can pay them with copies of the photos
  • ModelMayhem.com
    Membership site, you have to apply and provide samples of your work
    Pay with money / Time for Print/CD (quite common)
  • Modelling agencies
    Book your models get the look you’re after
    Pay with money and sometimes copies of the photos
  • Do a workshop
    
If you’re new to it all, take in a workshop. 
You’ll have a professional on hand to assist and source the talent.
    You pay to attend, but sometimes you’re also asked to 
provide a copy of you images for the model.

Top Subject Tips

  • Understand a photograph always happens on both sides of the camera
    Your confidence, excitement and energy will fuel theirs.
  • Direct your subject
    Tell them what you want them to do, 
but be open to suggestions.
  • Give the subject a story
    They’ll find it easier than “Be excited”, “Be sad”
  • Don’t touch your subject
    Without asking permission and reading the situation, most often there is no reason to invade their personal space.
  • Don’t be a G.W.C.
    A G.W.C. is a term given to, usually, a guy with a camera who has no plan for a shoot, just wants to see pretty ladies in skimpy outfits.
  • Show them, then don’t
    If you’re shooting someone unfamiliar with your work, show the the first couple of snaps on the back of the camera so they get a sense of who you are. Then don’t show them any more, it becomes a distraction and breaks the moment.

Top Location Tips

  • Find cool places
    Graffitied alleyways, parks, interesting walls; you’re looking for backgrounds that will add to your photo, 
but not overpower your subject.
  • Familiar to subject
    If you’re shooting someone who’s less comfortable in front of the lens, consider shooting in their environment.
  • Consider hiring a studio
    There are some which are inexpensive and will give you access to equipment and sometimes a professional to help.
  • Set up your own studio
    A home studio can be convenient but it will also take up a lot of space and may restrict the type of work you can do.

Upcoming

Presentation: Creative Travel with Glynn Lavender

Glynn from Creative Photo Workshops will be presenting.

Entries due for competition 6: Flash and Blur

Brooklyn Community Hall
24th September 2019 7:45 pm
Workshop: Lightroom and Photoshop - Artistic Post Production

We'll look at using Lightroom and Photoshop to enhance our creativity with regard to our post production workflows.

Brooklyn Community Hall
8th October 2019 7:45 pm

View full calendar